Ecthyma gangrenosum-like lesions caused by Candida sp.: A review of literature

Authors

  • Maria Taurina Christabella Chandra Firdiyono Department of Dermatology and Venereology Maranatha Christian University, Immanuel Hospital Bandung, Indonesia
  • Erlinda Karyadi Department of Dermatology and Venereology Maranatha Christian University, Immanuel Hospital Bandung, Indonesia
  • Leoni Agnes Department of Dermatology and Venereology Maranatha Christian University, Immanuel Hospital Bandung, Indonesia
  • Wulan Yuwita Department of Dermatology and Venereology Maranatha Christian University, Immanuel Hospital Bandung, Indonesia

Keywords:

Ecthyma gangrenosum-like lesions, Ecthyma gangrenosum, Candida sp., Disseminated candidiasis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Abstract

Abstract   Background: Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) is an uncommon, severe, and invasive cutaneous infection typically caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The skin lesion starts off as an erythematous nodule and progresses to a necrotic ulcer with central black eschar. Candida sp. is one of the other species that has been linked to EG-like lesions. Methods: By entering the keywords "Ecthyma gangrenosum" and "Candida" or "Candidal" or "Candidiasis" into PubMed, this review of the literature was conducted. The outcomes were not subjected to any filters or limitations on language. Results: Eight studies and nine cases with EG-like lesions connected to Candida sp. were evaluated and were available on PubMed between 1979 and 2016. One of the nine case reports had neonates as young as 12 days old, while the others in age from 21 to 69. Numerous case reports have used the culture in addition to the biopsies. Pseudohyphae or budding yeast were found in seven out of nine instances of histopathology. Three out of 9 cases reported as disseminated candidiasis. Conclusions: A candida infection, especially disseminated candidiasis, should be included in the differential diagnosis of an immunocompromised patient who shows necrotic lesions that mimic EG and be verified by biopsy as well as culture.   Key words:  Ecthyma gangrenosum-like lesions, ecthyma gangrenosum, Candida sp., disseminated candidiasis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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Published

2023-10-12

How to Cite

1.
Firdiyono MTCC, Karyadi E, Agnes L, Yuwita W. Ecthyma gangrenosum-like lesions caused by Candida sp.: A review of literature. J Pak Assoc Dermatol [Internet]. 2023Oct.12 [cited 2024Jun.17];33(4):1582-8. Available from: https://www.jpad.com.pk/index.php/jpad/article/view/2289

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