Scrofuloderma: a common type of cutaneous tuberculosis. A case report

Authors

  • Usma Iftikhar
  • Muhammad Nadeem
  • Shahbaz Aman
  • Atif Hasnain Kazmi

Keywords:

Scrofuloderma, tuberculosis, Mycobacterium, anti-tuberculous drugs

Abstract

Scrofuloderma is a common type of cutaneous tuberculosis characterized by a bluish-red nodule overlying an infected lymph gland, bone or joint that breaks down to form an undermined ulcer with a granulating tissue at the base. Progression of the disease leads to irregular adherent masses, densely fibrous at some places while fluctuant and discharging at others. It heals with a characteristic puckered scarring at the site of infection. The disease is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and common anti-tuberculous drugs are recommended for treatment. Many similar cases with additional features have been reported in foreign literature. We describe a case of this disorder along with review of literature. 

References

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Published

2016-12-22

How to Cite

1.
Iftikhar U, Nadeem M, Aman S, Kazmi AH. Scrofuloderma: a common type of cutaneous tuberculosis. A case report. J Pak Assoc Dermatol [Internet]. 2016Dec.22 [cited 2024Feb.26];21(1):61-5. Available from: http://www.jpad.com.pk/index.php/jpad/article/view/440

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Case Reports

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